The John Buchan Story

Peebles, Scotland

Category: News (page 1 of 2)

Western Front Tour – October 2018

The John Buchan Society is organising a visit to the main Battlefields, Museums and places in France & Belgium associated with John Buchan during 1915 to 1918. This tour will feature the places seen in the Museum’s “Battle of Arras” exhibition which is showing on our “big screen” and also those featured in our current exhibition “John Buchan – Director of Intelligence”.

Details of the tour and the booking form are given below.

 

Five Day tour

 

booking form

JOHN BUCHAN STORY Now open for the 2018 season!

We are pleased to announce that we are open for our sixth full season.

Our new exhibition focuses on the work of Buchan in 1918 as the Director of Information which involved making effective use of Britain’s war-time propaganda campaign. We trace Buchan’s progress from 1916 to 1919 – what a battle with politicians!

 

Last year’s exhibition on the Battle of Arras in featured on our  32-inch tablet along much of our archive material. This gives us the opportunity to show material hitherto locked away!

 

Those who have visited us in previous years will notice that the front of the museum has been brightened with the addition of a banner and a new window image:

 

 

John Buchan’s Amicable Anti-Modernism – posted 28 January 2018

John Buchan’s Amicable Anti-Modernism by Nathan Waddell, University of Birmingham, UK

 

This article considers the novelist John Buchan’s changing responses to literary modern-ism in the inter-war period. It argues that although Buchan has generally been taken as a straightforward opponent of modernist writing, careful study of his oeuvre dis-closes a more complex scenario in which an antagonism to certain modernist “excesses” is mixed with a qualified attraction to particular modernist innovations. The article’s central assumption is that a key part of Buchan’s worth to the New Modernist Studies lies in his querying — in novelistic as well as in essayistic forms — of the vocabularies now used to elaborate such literary-historical oppositions as high vs. low, for instance, or old vs. new. The article breaks new ground by moving beyond familiar Buchan texts — e.g. The Thirty-Nine Steps (1915) — into the less appreciated territory of his novel Huntingtower (1922), his literary criticism and his cultural commentaries. 

Please click the link below to read the full article.

jmodelite.35.2.64

The John Buchan Society – January 2018 Newsletter

The latest, January 2018,  John Buchan Society’s Newsletter is now available.

Please click on the link below to read the pdf version.

JBS-Newsletter-26

 

 

Episode 10 – John Buchan – Sick Heart River by The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Scottish Literature

To listen to this fascinating programme:

Episode 10 – John Buchan – Sick Heart River by The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Scottish Literature

please click on the link below:

https://soundcloud.com/user-265718587/episode-10-john-buchan-sick-heart-river

 

It is an hour long but well worth it!

Sunderland University – “The John Buchan Prize for best M.A. English Dissertation (November 2017)

On the 29 November 2017, Deborah Stewartby and Peter Worthington journeyed to Sunderland University to present the John Buchan Prize to Andrew (Andy) McCabe. This is the first time the prize has been awarded and we hope that over the years it will help to spread knowledge of John Buchan in the academic world.

 

Please click on the link below to read the press release from Sunderland University.

http://www.usonline.co.uk/news/39-steps-success

The Certificate signed by Lord Tweedsmuir and Steve Watts of Sunderland University

 

Andy dashing to be greeted by the Vice-Chancellor

 

                              

Lady Stewartby presenting the Certificate and prize to Andrew with his tutors, Colin and Alison Younger, and Peter Worthington  in the background

 

                      

Lady Stewartby and Andrew with Steve Watts (Head of the School of Culture) and Peter Worthington  in the background

 

John Buchan Story on ITV Border ‘Border Life’ – 20 November 2017

Some time ago, we had a visit from Border TV who filmed various aspects of the Museum. This included interviews with Deborah Stewartby about the family; Ursula Buchan about her forthcoming book; Ian Buckingham showing some of the artefacts.

This will form part of the Monday night ‘Border Life’ programme. and we may have a few minutes of fame! In fact, we had the entire programme devoted to the John Buchan Story!

Please click on the link to watch the programme

http://www.itv.com/news/border/update/2017-11-21/watch-border-life/

 

The John Buchan Story was closed when the programme was shown on television. However, we do open on request during the winter months – please telephone 01721 723525 for a viewing appointment or e-mail using the form on the contact page.

Donation of books to Peebles High School

We recently hosted a group of pupils from Peebles High School, who had a good look around the Museum and learnt more about John Buchan.

They will be reading ‘The 39 Steps’ in their English class and we look forward to hearing about how they found it! Their last book was Macbeth, so this will be quite a contrast  (although both have suspense and intrigue?)

To help the school, the Museum was delighted to present them with a set of the books for them to use. Richard Hannay lives on!

The Scribblings of Charlie Brown

Charles Brown, a former Merchant Navy Officer, an Engineer and Schoolteacher, is a keen fan of John Buchan.

He has sent us three of his scribblings:

Realms of Reality and Flights of Fancy.

“This is the bit of nonsense I made up after suggesting that walkers of the “The John Buchan Way” might like to try their hand at making up a wee story about the route they have enjoyed walking.”

Realms of Reality and Flights of Fancy

The Twa Fishers

I have included the translations of the lallands used in both texts.

Fishers TWIN Version

Capital Hills

You might also like this poem that I made up about the Pentland Hills.

Capital Hills

THE PENTLAND WRITERS and their “JOHN BUCHAN EXPERIENCE”

JOHN BUCHAN EXPERIENCE – Tuesday 11th April 2017.

On Tuesday evening in the ‘John Buchan Story’ located within Peebles Cambers Institution, a gathering of some volunteers who man the Museum in Peebles, together with other interested locals, enjoyed an evening of varied literary performance thanks to the efforts of the Pentland Writers Group.

Last autumn, the Pentland Writers had resolved to work on a project of creative writing based on the life, work and interests of Peebles literary hero, John Buchan. The group walked the John Buchan Way, around the hills and countryside between Peebles and Broughton, then spent time in the Museum gathering inspiration from the exhibits collected there. Additional history and background was provided by Lady Deborah Stewartby, granddaughter of the famous author.

In the period which followed, the individual members of the Writers’ Group created their own prose and poetry based on chosen aspects and artefacts in the Museum. The first public performance of their writing brought to life the Buchan past, both real and imagined, with a most interesting and entertaining collection of writing.

First to take the floor was Pete Macnab, who, as Treasurer of the Museum and Secretary of the Writers Group, had initiated the project. He focussed on the brief life of Violet Buchan, John’s youngest sister, who died at the age of 5. Photographs in the Museum show the decline in her health and her sad loss from bronchial illness not only devastated the family, but stole from us a lively mind and spirit.

Archie Hunter described the work of John Buchan in South Africa at the time of the Second Boer War. As a young (and probably ambitious) statesman, John Buchan had assisted in improving camps for the displaced tribes, which had a shocking record of illness and death because of their terrible conditions. Buchan had immersed himself in the work and the area, and a photograph with local tribesmen after a hunting exhibition may have been the source of the inkpot, adorned with the horns of a warthog, displayed in the Museum.

Next to take the floor was Anita John, local poet and author, who had taken as the basis for her work the letters from Alistair Buchan, fighting with the British Troops at Arras, to his mother. Alistair was to be killed on the first day of the battle almost one hundred years ago to the day. While no letters from his mother have survived, Anita imagined her side of the correspondence, and read a very moving series of letters reflecting the anxieties of the mother waiting at home for news, as well as the attempts of Alistair to offer reassurance to her.

With the audience clearly touched by the personal letters of war, real and imaginary, it was fitting that the next link from Stuart Delves, Convenor of Pentland Writers, highlighted the inclusion of Alistair Buchan in a published series of stories of Scottish soldiers at Arras, referring to the centenary of that tragic loss of life.

Stuart then read a passage from Buchan’s “Memory Hold the Door”, illustrating the author’s close affinity with nature and the Scottish Borders landscape which he loved, and in which he was most at home.

In the final section of the Writers’ programme, a varied and entertaining programme continued, with a good dose of humour added. John McCann imagined the author’s escapes as a boy into the hills of the area; Sara Innes wrote with a light touch in fine detail of the elements of fly- tying and brought the particular skills vividly to life; Pete Macnab returned with a lighter and very humorous contribution, apologising to both Burns and McGonagall, before reciting his “From a Fish”; A Canadian Head Dress, linked to the period when Buchan was Governor General of Canada, was the subject of a poem from Anita John; and the evening concluded with an imaginary conversation (with an ostrich no less) in which the ostrich feathers used in ceremonial headgear were cause for examination of the Meaning of Life – a very clever and amusing final piece from the pen of John McCann.

The audience had been thoroughly absorbed and entertained by the varied writings of the Pentland Group, which had brought life and body to the Buchan story and the Museum itself. It is hoped that this performance will be repeated as part of the Peebles Art Festival in late August, and can be heartily recommended if you are able to catch it.

 

The writers getting inspiration on the John Buchan Way

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